Course: Contemporary philosophy

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Course title Contemporary philosophy
Course code KFI/SOFIL
Organizational form of instruction Seminary
Level of course Master
Year of study not specified
Semester Winter
Number of ECTS credits 3
Language of instruction English
Status of course Compulsory-optional, Optional
Form of instruction Face-to-face
Work placements This is not an internship
Recommended optional programme components None
Course availability The course is available to visiting students
Lecturer(s)
  • Pacovská Kamila, Mgr. Ph.D.
Course content
I. Kant, Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals T. Nagel, "Moral Luck" B. Williams, "Moral Luck" R. Gaita, ch. "Remorse and its Lessons" in Good and Evil

Learning activities and teaching methods
Dialogic (discussion, interview, brainstorming), Work with text (with textbook, with book)
  • unspecified - 50 hours per semester
  • unspecified - 25 hours per semester
  • unspecified - 26 hours per semester
  • unspecified - 50 hours per semester
Learning outcomes
The main topic to be examined in the seminar is one of the key questions in contemporary analytic ethics about the nature of moral responsibility: Can we be blamed only for what was in our power or are we held responsible only for things that we could prevent or affect? The prevalent Kantian claim that it is only our intention or will that we are accountable for has been famously challenged by Bernard Williams's paper "Moral Luck" in 1976. Using several appealing examples, Williams showed that luck (that is, what is NOT in our power) enters many of our actions for which we are judged. Contrary to blame, Williams claims that it is our retrospective feelings such as regret, shame or remorse that should be analysed to explain personal responsibility. The course will have the form of a seminar in which the important papers in the discussion will be read and discussed. If there are any international students or if students expressly wish that, the course will be conducted in English.

Prerequisites
The students must be able to read texts in philosophy in English.

Assessment methods and criteria
Home assignment evaluation, Student performance assessment, Discussion

Active participation (max. 3 non-attendance), home preparation and active discussion of the papers and topics. The students will submit an essay in one of the discussed topics (deadline will be agreed upon).
Recommended literature


Study plans that include the course
Faculty Study plan (Version) Branch of study Category Recommended year of study Recommended semester
Faculty of Arts and Philosophy Philosophy (2013) Philosophy, theology - Winter
Faculty of Arts and Philosophy Cultural History (2013) History courses - Winter
Faculty of Arts and Philosophy Cultural History (2013) History courses - Winter
Faculty of Arts and Philosophy - (2015) Philological sciences - Winter
Faculty of Arts and Philosophy Cultural History (2013) History courses - Winter
Faculty of Arts and Philosophy Resocialization Pedagogy (2013) Pedagogy, teacher training and social care - Winter
Faculty of Arts and Philosophy Religious Studies (2013) Philosophy, theology - Winter
Faculty of Arts and Philosophy Cultural History (2013) History courses - Winter
Faculty of Arts and Philosophy Social Anthropology (2013) Social sciences - Winter
Faculty of Arts and Philosophy Cultural History (2013) History courses - Winter
Faculty of Arts and Philosophy English Language Teacher Education (2013) Pedagogy, teacher training and social care - Winter
Faculty of Arts and Philosophy Social Anthropology (2016) Social sciences - Winter
Faculty of Arts and Philosophy Philosophy (2013) Philosophy, theology 2 Winter
Faculty of Arts and Philosophy Cultural History (2013) History courses - Winter
Faculty of Arts and Philosophy English Language Teacher Education (2013) Pedagogy, teacher training and social care - Winter